Who loves ya, baby?

— Catchphrase popularized by “Kojak” (1973-1978)

Much of the ability to get recommendations comes down to the personal connection with the folks you’re working with. By the end of an engagement, you generally know who likes you and who “gets it”.

As we wrap up the project and debrief, the topics of ‘satisfaction’ and ‘fullfillment of expectations’ are usually discussed. That’s an opportune moment for verifying your professional Value Proposition. “Did we accomplish what you expected? Did you get what you wanted?” Lead naturally to “Would you work with me again?

Be honest & generous with your client and they’ll be honest & generous with you.

I’m happy to say that a high percentage of clients and colleagues have willingly given me positive reviews. (25+) … and literally hundreds of professional endorsements on LinkedIn.

Framing: I provide a hybrid creative/tech service – often as an outsider contractor to large, well-established businesses. Those organizationss can be a little stuffy and reluctant to issue recommendations “in their name” (as a matter of policy).  However…

  • A happy advocate-within-the-org will often gladly forward your name to someone who CAN give you a recommendation.

The nature of my service, “user experience” and “usability” is sometimes not well-understood or well-appreciated by the client business itself, as software creation (websites) and customer-centric self-service are … a different business.

  • If you’ve provided something unusual or unexpected, then your services can be perceived as remarkable … and valuable. Don’t miss an opportunity to advocate’n’educate.

Basic rule-of-thumb:

Your client bases their recommendation on what you do for them, not whether you’re skilled at your profession.


© The Communication Studio LLC